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January Highlights

January Cover Art

True and apparent optogenetic BOLD fMRI signals, by Florian Schmid, Lydia Wachsmuth, Franziska Albers, Miriam Schwalm, Albrecht Stroh and Cornelius Faber.

January Editor’s Picks 

Advanced processing and simulation of MRS data using the FID appliance (FID-A)—An open source, MATLAB-based toolkit, by Robin Simpson, Gabriel A. Devenyi, Peter Jezzard, T. Jay Hennessy and Jamie Near.

Downfield-NOE-suppressed amide-CEST-MRI at 7 Tesla provides a unique contrast in human glioblastoma, by Moritz Zaiss, Johannes Windschuh, Steffen Goerke, Daniel Paech, Jan-Eric Meissner, Sina Burth, Philipp Kickingereder, Wolfgang Wick, Martin Bendszus, Heinz-Peter Schlemmer, Mark E. Ladd, Peter Bachert and Alexander Radbruch.

By |January 6th, 2017|Highlights-post|Comments Off on January Highlights

Q&A with Lia Hocke, Yunjie Tong, and Blaise Frederick

 

BY MARK CHIEW

Two days after American Thanksgiving, we had the opportunity to speak with Lia Hocke, Yunjie Tong and Blaise Frederick about their recent MRM paper “Comparison of peripheral near-infrared spectroscopy low-frequency oscillations to other denoising methods in resting state functional MRI with ultrahigh temporal resolution”. Working out of the McLean Hospital, part of Harvard Medical School, they shared their perspective on the mutual information contained in peripheral NIRS (near infrared spectroscopy) and fMRI signals. They also used the word “photoplethysmograph” correctly in a sentence, and left us with a delightful shout-out to statistical rigor.

By |December 16th, 2016|Highlights-post, Highlights-QA|Comments Off on Q&A with Lia Hocke, Yunjie Tong, and Blaise Frederick

Q&A with Dongwook Lee and Jong Chul Ye

BY XIN MIAO

Dongwook Lee is currently a PhD student at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). He works on advanced image reconstruction techniques for dynamic MRI. His paper, selected as the Editor’s Pick for December, is entitled “Acceleration of MR parameter mapping using annihilating filter-based low rank Hankel matrix (ALOHA)”. ALOHA is a novel image reconstruction algorithm with the goal of clear, artifact free images acquired from very fast imaging schemes. For this paper, ALOHA was applied to accelerated MR parameter mapping, but could also be used for dynamic and parallel MRI, and even non-MR applications. We recently invited Dongwook and his supervisor, Dr. Jong Chul Ye, to talk about this paper.

By |December 8th, 2016|Highlights-post, Highlights-QA|Comments Off on Q&A with Dongwook Lee and Jong Chul Ye

December Highlights

December Cover Art

α-trideuteromethyl[15N]glutamine: A long-lived hyperpolarized perfusion marker, by Markus Durst, Enrico Chiavazza, Axel Haase, Silvio Aime, Markus Schwaiger and Rolf F. Schultz.

December Editor’s Picks 

Comparison of peripheral near-infrared spectroscopy low-frequency oscillations to other denoising methods in resting state functional MRI with ultrahigh temporal resolution, by Lia M. Hocke, Yunjie Tong, Kimberly P. Lindsey and Blaise de B. Frederick. Link to audio slides.

Acceleration of MR parameter mapping using annihilating filter-based low rank hankel matrix (ALOHA), by Dongwook Lee, Kyong Hwan Jin, Eung Yeop Kim, Sung-Hong Park and Jong Chul Ye. Link to audio slides. 

By |December 2nd, 2016|Highlights-post, Highlights-QA|Comments Off on December Highlights

Q&A with Elias Kellner, Valerij Kiselev and Marco Reisert

BY THIJS DHOLLANDER

Recently, we had a chat with Elias Kellner, Valerij Kiselev and Marco Reisert from the University Medical Center Freiburg about their MRM paper entitled “Gibbs-Ringing Artifact Removal Based on Local Subvoxel-Shifts”. A challenge in time zone management, the interview was an early morning event for the MRM highlights editor (Nikola, in Montreal) and a late evening for the interviewer (Thijs, in Melbourne); however, that didn’t stop us discussing not only the paper, but also the art of paper writing and valuable lessons for the developers of novel acquisition strategies.

By |November 17th, 2016|Highlights-post, Highlights-QA|Comments Off on Q&A with Elias Kellner, Valerij Kiselev and Marco Reisert

Q&A with Brian Hansen & Sune Jespersen

 

BY JESSICA MCKAY

This month’s Editor’s Pick features a project that makes kurtosis imaging more accessible to clinicians and researchers, alike, from a group in Denmark that includes our interviewees: Brian Hansen and Sune Jespersen. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) increases sensitivity to microstructural changes by extending the diffusion signal expression to account for non-Gaussian effects, but it typically requires time-consuming acquisitions with high diffusion weighting. Brian and Sune’s group had previously described a fast protocol, referred to as the 1-3-9 scheme, that includes three diffusion directions at a low b-value to determine the mean diffusivity and 9 specific diffusion directions at a higher b-value to calculate mean kurtosis [Hansen et al. MRM 69, 2013]. In this work, they extend the protocol to make it more robust to experimental imperfections by acquiring all 9 directions at the lower b-value, which they call 1-9-9. They further characterize the optimum b-values and propose a method to correct for imperfect diffusion directions. Keep reading to find out how their acquisition scheme expands the clinical value and feasibility of kurtosis imaging and you may even be inspired to add this ~1-minute scan onto your own protocol.

By |November 13th, 2016|Highlights-post, Highlights-QA|Comments Off on Q&A with Brian Hansen & Sune Jespersen

Q&A with Florian Dittmann and Ingolf Sack

BY YOGESH MARIAPPAN

As the field of MRI is slowly but surely moving from qualitative to quantitative, and from imaging structures to imaging other properties, the choice of this month’s Highlights article is apt: the research group led by Ingolf Sack has been at the forefront of both of these aspects with their work on MR Elastography (MRE). This is a quantitative imaging technique capable of measuring the mechanical properties of tissues of interest and is available from all the major vendors. The current clinical application is focused on liver where the stiffness (measured in kilopascals) is used for fibrosis assessment. In this article they have provided recent results from their “In vivo wideband multi-frequency work” on liver and brain.

By |October 28th, 2016|Highlights-post, Highlights-QA|Comments Off on Q&A with Florian Dittmann and Ingolf Sack

Q&A with Melissa Terpstra and Gulin Öz

BY ADAM ELKHALED

In this edition of Highlights Q&A, we were treated to a virtual interview with Dr. Melissa Terpstra and Dr. Gülin Öz, whose work at the University of Minnesota Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) has provided unique insight into the reproducibility of spectroscopic data. Our conversation revolved around their investigative efforts to understand how field strength influences consistent neurochemical quantification. By comparing short-echo semi-LASER data from 3T and 7T acquisitions, they managed to arrive at some interesting conclusions that bear direct relevance to other studies, and also underscore the necessity of quality assurance for purposes of clinical translation.

By |October 17th, 2016|Highlights-post, Highlights-QA|Comments Off on Q&A with Melissa Terpstra and Gulin Öz

October Highlights

Our MR Community is saddened by news of the passing Erwin Hahn, of one our founding pioneers. Professor Hahn was an Honorary Member of the journal, and provided an in-depth interview earlier this year, which is available in the Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Highlights Print Supplement.

October Cover Art

High-resolution 1H-MRSI of the brain using SPICE: Data acquisition and image reconstruction, by Fan Lam, Chao Ma, Bryan Clifford, Curtis L. Johnson and Zhi-Pei Liang.

October Editor’s Picks 

Test-retest reproducibility of neurochemical profiles with short-echo, single-voxel MR spectroscopy at 3T and 7T, by Melissa Terpstra, Ian Cheong, Tianmeng Lyu, Dinesh K. Deelchand, Uzay E. Emir, Petr Bednařík, Lynn E. Eberly and Gülin Öz. Link to audioslides.

In vivo wideband multifrequency MR elastography of the human brain and liver, byFlorian Dittmann, Sebastian Hirsch, Heiko Tzschätzsch, Jing Guo, Jürgen Braun and Ingolf Sack. Link to audioslides.

By |October 5th, 2016|Highlights-post|Comments Off on October Highlights

Q&A with 2015 ISMRM Challenge Winners

The ISMRM Challenge (http://challenge.ismrm.org) is an open competition series that seeks solutions to critical problems in MRI. As described by organizers in a recent publication, the 2015 Challenge focused on radiofrequency (RF) pulse design, with two specific sub-problems. The first was the design of shorter slice-selective parallel transmission (pTx) pulses for ultra-high field MRI, which are necessary for multislice acquisitions with uniform sensitivity and contrast. Before the Challenge, the best slice-selective pTx pulses required users to sacrifice resolution in the slice dimension as well as spectral bandwidth, in order to gain uniform contrast and signal. The Challenge sought to overcome that tradeoff by encouraging contestants to design the shortest possible slice-selective pTx pulses that excited sharp slices with uniform flip angles in-plane. The second problem was the design of shorter multiband refocusing pulses which are required for spin echo simultaneous multislice (SMS) imaging. Before the Challenge, the maximum achievable multiband factor for important spin echo SMS neuroimaging scans was limited by the high SAR of their refocusing pulses, which must simultaneously refocus a large number of slices. The Challenge sought to overcome that problem by encouraging contestants to design the shortest possible multiband refocusing pulses, subject to peak power and SAR constraints.

Mihir Pendse (left), of pTx winning team StanfordUHF, and Christoph Aigner (right), of SMS winning team rfcontrol, accepting their awards from ISMRM president Garry Gold at the 2016 Annual Meeting.
By |September 24th, 2016|Highlights-post|Comments Off on Q&A with 2015 ISMRM Challenge Winners